Mark Lakeman

Mark Lakeman

Mark Lakeman

 

 

Mark Lakeman

City Repair / Communitecture
www.cityrepair.org www.communitecture.net 

Bio: Mark is a creative, urban place-maker in his commitment to the emergence of a thriving and sustainable cultural landscape. He seeks to make every design project one which will further the development of a community vision, whether it involves urban design and place making, ecological building, encourages community interaction, or assists those who typically do not have access to design services. Mark’s leadership in Communitecture, and its nonprofit affiliate The City Repair Project, has benefited communities across the North American continent.

Communitecture designs beautiful and sustainable places that bring people together in community. With an approach that explores new creative territories, Communitecture is absolutely committed to sustainability, while respecting the needs and priorities of all the individuals, families, and communities with whom we work and play.

City Repair is group of citizen activists creating public gathering places and helping others to creatively transform the places where they live. City Repair’s projects:

  • inspire people to both understand themselves as part of a larger community and fulfill their own creative potential, and
  • activate people to be part of the communities around them, as well as part of the decision-making that shapes the future of their communities.

The many projects of City Repair have been accomplished by a mostly volunteer staff and the help of hundreds of volunteer citizen activists.

***

gallery display of Mark Lakeman's architectural renderings and designs

gallery display of Mark Lakeman's architectural renderings and designs

 

****Monumental Ideas Proposal****

Monumental Ideas

Monumental Ideas Proposal

Monumental Ideas Proposal: Festival Celebration of the Willamette River Watershed

In 1998 the Portland Rose Festival held the Monumental Ideas Competition and this group, including three City Repair and Communitecture designers, won first prize. The concept was to install a more culturally-focused east side reflection of the commercial Rose Festival located on the west side. The event would be a festival celebration of the Willamette River watershed, accomodated within an ephemeral village made of recycled materials, local natural materials, and all of it designed and built by Portland school kids and their families. Though The WaterGather won the competition, the Rose Festival did not follow through on providing the promised 25,000 dollars in seed money. The festival had to take other forms, such as through The Village Building Convergence that is held in Portland each year.

Descriptions of exhibited drawings:
The Landmark: The journey of a little girl and a beckoning goddess begins at the east end of the Morrison Bridge.

The Path: The journey proceeds through dozens of celebratory arches made by local schools. 

The Ruins: The journey stops at the site of winding trellises that evoke a sense of the passing of time and nature’s resilience.

The Gate: The little girl arrives at the entrance to the watershed village, passing under a glorious dome made of common yard debris yet home to hundreds of birds.

The Hut: She arrives within a meeting house of light & space, inspired by numerous indigenous meeting house prototypes.

The Cave: Before passing on to numerous other fabulous gathering spaces, the  little girl descends within an earthen building that spirals down into the ground.

 

**** Intersection Repair ****

gallery display of Share-It Square

gallery display of Intersection Repair: Share-It Square Community Process Documents

Share-It Square

Intersection Repair: Share-It Square Community Process Documents

Intersection Repair: Share-It Square Community Process Documents
Refined Graphic Concept, Survey of Local Flora, and Governance Diagram
Ink & Pencil, Bond Paper, Vellum, & Trace Paper, 1996-97
Sellwood Neighbors & Mark Lakeman

These three drawings are among hundreds generated during the ongoing process of self-development that began at SE 9th & Sherrett thirteen years ago, in the spring of 1996.

The drawing above and details below is a finished concept for the first legalized installion version at Share-It Square, after the initial guerilla graphic had already been installed. 

Share-It Square....detail of design plan

Intersection Repair: Share-It Square Community Process Documents

Share-It Square

Intersection Repair: Share-It Square Community Process Documents

The next two Share-It Square drawings include a graphic representation of the geography of self-governance involving every person within a two block radius of Share-It square, and a major flora inventory of the four blocks connected to the square, which should really be called a cirlcle by now anyway.  

Share-It Square....detail of environmental evaluation

Intersection Repair: Share-It Square Community Process Documents

Share-It Square

Intersection Repair: Share-It Square Community Process Documents

 

****Dignity Village****

Dignity Village

Dignity Village

Dignity Village Aerial Views
Initial Vision 2000 Concept
Ink on Bond Paper
Mark Lakeman & Mark Moore, Communitecture
Portland, Oregon 

Dignity Village is an intentional community of Portland homeless people creating their own alternative to the shelter system. City Repair has provided assistance on design and permitting.

The three “time-lapse” type drawings exhibited in the show feature the same viewpoint are part of the original proposal to the Portland City Council for the legalization of Dignity Village. These three were part of a much more extensive visionary document that was quickly approved by the council, thus establishing the village as a permanent part of the continuum of support for homeless people. The exhibited drawings show the 

A) initial settlement of what had before been a nomadic village, installing the public place and path infrastructure with all essential systems

B) (as shown above) a transitional “canopy” phase designed to support the village through winter weather, and 

C) a final “built out” phase of permanent passive solar buildings to made out of all natural and recycled materials.

 

**** T-Horse ****

T-Horse

T-Horse

The T-Horse 
Ephemeral Community Gathering Place
Plans, Sections,and Elevations
1982 Toyota SR5, recycled plexi, wood, greenhouse membrane, and bamboo.
Built in Sellwood, Oregon 1996-97
pencil, ink, on trace paper, printed as “working documents” on bond.
Sellwood Neighbors & Mark Lakeman, with help from Lacandon Maya and Cheyenne.

Guided by the principle that “the most powerful force in the world is a story”, T-Horse emerged as a butterfly from within the “cocoon” of the T-Hows as an ephemeral place of mythological scale. The story would become that, after the city government had declared that the T-Hows had to be deconstructed, T-Horse emerged to transcend the remote power of the city to decide the destiny of communities. Traversing the gridscape, T-Horse engaged the “geography of nowhere”,  traveling around and around the city for several years, convening convergences of people to undertake giant social linkages and birth new initiatives such as Hands Around Portland, Earth Day Village, Free Geek, Family Supper, RIPE Catering, Clark Lewis, Gotham Tavern, The Village Building Convergence, and The City Repair Project itself. Next came T-Pony, many T-Stations, T-Palas, T-Bike, T-Whale, and T-Snail. T-Horse has recently been rebuilt and is about to be joined by Chi-Horse. 

T-Horse

T-Horse

T-Horse

T-Horse

T-Horse

T-Horse

 

****Intersection Repair Manifesto****

Intersection Repair Manifesto

Intersection Repair Manifesto

Intersection Repair Manifesto, 1996
Sellwood, Oregon
pencil, ink, on trace paper, printed as “working documents” on bond
Sellwood Neighbors & Mark Lakeman, with help from Lacandon Maya and Cheyenne.

After the initial success of the T-Hows project, which radicalized the local population around SE 9th & Sherrett in Sellwood, this document was prepared as a motivational and background context basis for direct, creative action. Numerous neighborhood families had become connected with each other as a result of the T-Hows, and the Intersection Repair Manifesto inspired them to also understand that the colonial grid with its absence of place at the intersection crossroads was an important part of why Americans live in perhaps the most acute state of social isolation of all first world nations. Simply, because the American version of the roman grid was designed to feature the fewest gathering places in the history of colonial expansion, our country has the fewest ways to even know the names of the people we live among. Other laws and ordinances reinforce the disintegration of the functions of urban life, such as living and working, to an awful social result that our lives are continuously characterized by a sense of isolation and powerlessness.

This little place in the network of cities had awakened to this story, and decided that by reclaiming the right of way they could inspire other neighborhoods and cities to do it too, as has happened now across the North American continent. 

Intersection Repair Manifesto

Intersection Repair Manifesto

Intersection Repair Manifesto

Intersection Repair Manifesto

 

****Redwood Tower & Solar Piazza****

Salt Lake City

Redwood Tower & Solar Piazza Drawing

 Redwood Tower & Solar Piazza Drawings
First Place, Redwood Tower Competition, Salt Lake City, Utah 1999.
Ink on Watercolor Paper & Bond w/ Pencils
City Repair Designers in Collaboration

This winning entry, to an international competition for the design of an innovative public space, was presented as three beautifully rendered boards accompanied with an extensive concept model. The design was developed by several young City Repair designers who had begun to undertake radical design demonstration projects, through competitions and other means. This is the second initiative, after the first-place winning design for Portland’s Monumental Ideas Competition; The Watergather Watershed Festival.

Redwood Tower was to be a spatial, solar time-telling gathering place, installed on a college campus in Salt Lake City. Though the City Repair team’s design won all ten categories, beating the Spanish and Japanese designs, the commission was awarded to the highest placing Mormon team. At this time the young designers also decided to establish a separate, more flexible design entity that became known as Communitecture.

City Repair participants in the Utah project included Mark Lakeman, Oso Martin, Sandra Lakeman, Michael Hebb, Joseph Cristman, Saskia Dresler, and Michael D’Angelo.

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City

 

****Bay City Vision Plan****

Bay City Vision Plan

Bay City Vision Plan

Bay City 20-Year Vision Plan
Bay City, Oregon
Pen, ink, pencil on bond paper
Supported by The National Endowment For The Arts
Outreach and community participation facilitated by City Repair, designs compiled and presented by Communitecture.

These presentation boards describe the 20-year sustainable redevelopment vision for Bay City, a small town of approximately 1,500 residents just north of Tillamook on the Oregon coast. After several rounds of community dialogues and design cycles, a future vision emerged that would reinvent the civic landscape by enriching the public realm so that it will become more walkable and talkable. This vision will be supported by community engagement processes that build social networks as an infrastructure places and linkages emerges. The projects will all be ecological in emphasis, with the notion of sustainability being built upon stronger participatory democracy.

Bay City Vision Plan....(detail)

Bay City Vision Plan....(detail)

Bay City Vision Plan....(detail)

Bay City Vision Plan....(detail)

 

****Monday T-Hows Manifesto****

Manifesto

Monday T-Hows Manifesto

 Monday T-Hows Manifesto, 1996

Sellwood, Oregon
pencil, ink, on trace paper, printed as “working documents” on bond.
Mark Lakeman, with help from Lacandon Maya and Cheyenne.

This is the manifesto of the guerrilla place making project that initiated both The City Repair Project and Communitecture. Built of all natural and recycled materials at a cost of merely 65 dollars, the T-Hows was created to reassert timeless principles of urban aesthetics and economics, while also refuting a plethora of the dogma of industrial modernism, such as that nature and humanity are somehow separate. This manifesto was created to explain the revolutionary concept and benefits of restoring culturally-oriented places and socially propelled economics to monocultural neighborhood tracts where most Americans tend to live in isolation from each other.

With a serious awareness of the impact of the roman colonial grid-based planning that underlies westward expansion, this little tea house with its manifesto was designed to be an antivirus “set of plans” that would travel throughout the bureaucratic systems of the city because it was beautiful and strange, and also because it both explains a great deal about who we have become, and also who we can be. It’s impact was intended to be the loosening and humanizing of city government, and the manifesto seems to have greatly contributed to such an effect in Portland.

Manifesto....(detail)

Monday T-Hows Manifesto….(detail)

Manifesto

Monday T-Hows Manifesto

 

****A Vision for Home ****

A New Vision for Home

gallery display of A Vision For Home: Community-Generated Retrofit Prototype

A Vision For Home: Community-Generated Retrofit Prototype
Ink & Pencil, Printed on Bond Paper
Pedro & Adriana Ferbel-Azcarate, Mark Lakeman, Jenn Rawling, & Trillium Shannon
8512 Free State, Sellwood, Oregon

This ongoing project is transforming a downtrodden 1906 stick frame mill worker’s home into a thriving urban permaculture prototype. The 50 x 100 site features numerous sustainable systems and building designs featuring numerous reclaimed and recycled materials such as cob and straw. In fact, with all of its social and ecological features, the ground level of this project is a tour de force demonstration of a dazzling array of types of  community common spaces.

This is also the original home of both City Repair and Communitecture, and it is also the location where the first T-Horse was built.

A New Vision For Home

A Vision For Home: Community-Generated Retrofit Prototype

A New Vision for Home....(detail)

A Vision For Home: Community-Generated Retrofit Prototype

 

****Earth Day 2000 Poster****

Earth Day 2000 Festival Poster....(detail)

Earth Day 2000 Festival Poster....(detail)

Earth Day 2000 Poster
B&W printed at original size and reduced color pencil poster version.
Pen & Ink, printed on bond paper.
Drawing & poster produced by City Repair, designs by Communitecture.

This poster depicts actual events on Earth Day, 2000 as they were designed to play out from the Memorial Coliseum, over the Broadway Bridge, and up that street to Pioneer Courthouse Square. The day began with thousands of people flooding the streets to participate in the nature-costumed “Procession of the Species”, who then arrived at the public square for the afternoon Earth Day Celebration extravaganza. The day also including “Hands Around Portland”, a 6.2 mile circle of people linking together to reclaim public space.

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